ALERT: We Are Pleased To Announce The Michigan Thrive Initative Passed The House

The Michigan Thrive Initiative

We are a coalition of leading Michigan economic development organizations, cities and chambers who support legislation to unleash $5 billion in major brownfield redevelopment projects that will transform cities across the state.

The Need
  1. Empty Zones: Cities and towns across Michigan are plagued by large, challenging brownfield sites that need to be developed to revitalize local economies statewide.

  2. Zero Financing: Developers have tried for years to make the numbers work but need an economic development tool to close the funding gap.

  3. A 21st Century Economy: Enacting legislation to unlock these projects is critical to Michigan’s economic future. We need vibrant, live-work-play communities to attract talent and business and grow our economy.

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The Solution

Pass the Michigan Thrive Initiative and provide private investors with a tool to unlock $5 billion in development to create “live, work, play” communities from the Upper Peninsula to Kalamazoo.

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UNLOCK PROJECTS FROM EVERY CORNER OF MICHIGAN

Click on the pins to learn more

STERLING HEIGHTS “LAKESIDE MALL”

Lakeside Mall
This 1.5-million square-foot shopping center built in 1976 is still in business, but the city hopes to redevelop it in order to attract and retain business and jobs for the next 40 years.

SOUTHFIELD “NORTHLAND MALL”

The largest shopping mall in the world when it opened in 1954, the 125-acre mall is now vacant and slated for demolition. The city hopes to redevelop the area as a master-planned district that creates an exciting destination for businesses and residents and enhances the value of communities all around it. More information on the city’s transformational vision can be found at http://www.imaginenorthland.com/

PETOSKEY “THE HOLE”

Lakeside Mall
In Downtown Petoskey there is a vacant block locally known as “The Hole.”  Since 2005, several developers have looked at the site and presented plans and renderings. However, none has been able to put a deal together. This legislation represents a new hope to finally build a vibrant development that will bring new jobs, growth and activity to Downtown Petoskey.

SAGINAW

Lakeside Mall
Local leaders are working on a comprehensive, multi-project vision to revitalize downtown Saginaw that will take advantage of the city’s key economic anchors and attract 21st century, knowledge-based businesses. But this legislation is critical to overcoming the economic challenges and making the vision a reality.

MUSKEGON “SAPPI PAPER MILL”

Pure Muskegon is leading the effort to transform this contaminated site into residential and commercial development on the waterfront. The mill closed in 2009 after being an industrial operation for more than 100 years. The project would bring tremendous economic benefits for the area - including new jobs, residents, and tourists - and transform the Muskegon waterfront.

GRAND RAPIDS “GRAND RIVER RAPIDS RESTORATION”

Lakeside Mall
Restoring the Grand River and promoting the redevelopment of underutilized waterfront property – old industrial sites, obsolete public facilities and surface parking lots – is the game-changer for Michigan’s second largest city. The legislation can play a critical role catalyzing investment in new mixed-use development, high quality public spaces and new recreational amenities as well as modern infrastructure that will better protect the city from flood risks. 

KALAMAZOO “ARCADIA COMMONS WEST”

The redevelopment of a four-block area in downtown Kalamazoo has long been one the city’s top priorities and a key part of its strategy to build a vibrant downtown environment that attracts talent and businesses. While there have been various plans over the past decade, none have been able to overcome the financial gap and move forward.

JACKSON “THE HAYES HOTEL”

This iconic 10-story structure in the heart of Downtown Jackson has been vacant since 2003. The city and its development partner, HRS Communities, have plans to transform it to a mixed-use development that will be a catalyst for revitalizing the area. The project is part of the broader Anchor Initiative focused on making downtown Jackson a vibrant “live-work-play” destination.

LANSING “RED RENAISSANCE”

A proposed $380 million mixed-use village project on Michigan Avenue will connect Michigan State University and the downtowns of Lansing and East Lansing. The city-owned brownfield site requires over $75 million in infrastructure improvements, and redevelopment has stalled for years because of a lack of tools to bridge the funding gap.

PONTIAC “THE SILVERDOME”

The legislation would support the transformation of the vacant complex into a major mixed-use development that brings jobs, businesses and economic activity to Pontiac.

MARYSVILLE “FMR. DTE POWER PLANT”

The City of Marysville is working on concepts to redevelop the former DTE power plant along the St. Clair River into a thriving riverfront destination. The initial development concepts would transform the 30-acre site into a new public marina and riverwalk, hotel, and commercial/retail space within an hours drive from millions of Michigan residents.

GRATIOT COUNTY “DOWNTOWN ALMA WATERFRONT”

Lakeside Mall
In 2007, the city moved a metal scrap yard and railroad off the riverfront to create the possibility of a revitalized waterfront district with housing, dining, shopping, and recreational opportunities. Given the significant cost of cleanup, infrastructure and redevelopment challenges, the vision has yet to be realized.

SAULT STE. MARIE

Lakeside Mall
The city has developed a broad vision for new mixed-use and tourism-oriented development downtown and has identified a number of target sites, many of which have been vacant for decades. Combined with the modernization of the Soo Locks, these projects represent the future of Sault Ste. Marie – one of the most beautiful and economically significant cities in all of Michigan.

DETROIT

Lakeside Mall
Rock Ventures has announced that this legislation would pave the way for $2.5 billion in transformational new development that would put Detroit on a path to being one of the most exciting and vibrant cities in the nation to live, work, and locate a business.

DETROIT

The Fisher Building, located in Detroit’s New Center district, is one of the most iconic buildings in Michigan. Designed by Albert Kahn, it is often referred to as “Detroit’s Largest Art Object.” The building, which has suffered from years of neglect, is now under the ownership of a civically-minded group that is committed to restoring it to its former glory. The Michigan Thrive Initiative is critical to making this happen.

UNLOCK PROJECTS FROM EVERY CORNER OF MICHIGAN

  • PETOSKEY “THE HOLE”: In Downtown Petoskey there is a vacant block locally known as “The Hole.”  Since 2005, several developers have looked at the site and presented plans and renderings. However, none has been able to put a deal together. This legislation represents a new hope to finally build a vibrant development that will bring new jobs, growth and activity to Downtown Petoskey.
  • SAGINAW: Local leaders are working on a comprehensive, multi-project vision to revitalize downtown Saginaw that will take advantage of the city’s key economic anchors and attract 21st century, knowledge-based businesses. But this legislation is critical to overcoming the economic challenges and making the vision a reality.
  • MUSKEGON “SAPPI PAPER MILL”: Pure Muskegon is leading the effort to transform this contaminated site into residential and commercial development on the waterfront. The mill closed in 2009 after being an industrial operation for more than 100 years. The project would bring tremendous economic benefits for the area – including new jobs, residents, and tourists – and transform the Muskegon waterfront.
  • GRAND RAPIDS “GRAND RIVER RAPIDS RESTORATION”: Restoring the Grand River and promoting the redevelopment of underutilized waterfront property – old industrial sites, obsolete public facilities and surface parking lots – is the game-changer for Michigan’s second largest city. The legislation can play a critical role catalyzing investment in new mixed-use development, high quality public spaces and new recreational amenities as well as modern infrastructure that will better protect the city from flood risks.
  • KALAMAZOO “Arcadia Commons West”: The redevelopment of a four-block area in downtown Kalamazoo has long been one the city’s top priorities and a key part of its strategy to build a vibrant downtown environment that attracts talent and businesses. While there have been various plans over the past decade, none have been able to overcome the financial gap and move forward.
  • JACKSON “THE HAYES HOTEL”: This iconic 10-story structure in the heart of Downtown Jackson has been vacant since 2003. The city and its development partner, HRS Communities, have plans to transform it to a mixed-use development that will be a catalyst for revitalizing the area. The project is part of the broader Anchor Initiative focused on making downtown Jackson a vibrant “live-work-play” destination.
  • LANSING “RED CEDAR RENAISSANCE”: A proposed $380 million mixed-use village project on Michigan Avenue will connect Michigan State University and the downtowns of Lansing and East Lansing. The city-owned brownfield site requires over $75 million in infrastructure improvements, and redevelopment has stalled for years because of a lack of tools to bridge the funding gap.
  • PONTIAC “THE SILVERDOME”: The legislation would support the transformation of the vacant complex into a major mixed-use development that brings jobs, businesses and economic activity to Pontiac.
  • SOUTHFIELD “NORTHLAND MALL”: The largest shopping mall in the world when it opened in 1954, the 125-acre mall is now vacant and slated for demolition. The city hopes to redevelop the area as a master-planned district that creates an exciting destination for businesses and residents and enhances the value of communities all around it. More information on the city’s transformational vision can be found at http://www.imaginenorthland.com/.
  • STERLING HEIGHTS “LAKESIDE MALL”: This 1.5-million square-foot shopping center built in 1976 is still in business, but has experienced economic challenges for years and is now being marketed for sale. The city hopes to reimagine and revitalize the entire district so that it remains vibrant and relevant for the next 40 years.
  • MARYSVILLE “DTE POWER PLANT”: The City of Marysville is working on concepts to redevelop the former DTE power plant along the St. Clair River into a thriving riverfront destination. The initial development concepts would transform the 30-acre site into a new public marina and riverwalk, hotel, and commercial/retail space within an hours drive from millions of Michigan residents.
  • GRATIOT COUNTY “DOWNTOWN ALMA WATERFRONT”: In 2007, the city moved a metal scrap yard and railroad off the riverfront to create the possibility of a revitalized waterfront district with housing, dining, shopping, and recreational opportunities. Given the significant cost of cleanup, infrastructure and redevelopment challenges, the vision has yet to be realized.
  • SAULT STE. MARIE: The city has developed a broad vision for new mixed-use and tourism-oriented development downtown and has identified a number of target sites, many of which have been vacant for decades. Combined with the modernization of the Soo Locks, these projects represent the future of Sault Ste. Marie – one of the most beautiful and economically significant cities in all of Michigan.
  • DETROIT: Rock Ventures has announced that this legislation would pave the way for $2.5 billion in transformational new development that would put Detroit on a path to being one of the most exciting and vibrant cities in the nation to live, work, and locate a business.
  • DETROIT: The Fisher Building, located a block off the intersection of Woodward Avenue and Grand Blvd, is one of the most iconic buildings in Michigan. Designed by Albert Kahn, and often referred to as “Detroit’s Largest Art Object”, the Fisher is a beacon for Detroit. The Fisher Building is under new ownership of a civically-minded group that has started to reinvest in the building, which has suffered from years of neglect. The Michigan Thrive Initiative will unlock the potential of their plans.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

The Michigan Thrive Initiative in the News

Michigan lawmakers continue work on plan to help redevelop abandoned sites

wwmt.com
March 7, 2017

MI Thrive Reintroduces Package of Bills to Revitalize Communities

9&10 News
February 7, 2017

Michigan Senate poised to pass brownfield legislation

Crain’s Detroit Business
February 20, 2017

Michigan Thrive Initiative legislation reintroduced in state Senate

Sault Ste Marie Evening News
February 8, 2017

Pontiac mayor: Tax plan could pump up Silverdome site

Detroit News
February 9, 2017

Michigan looks to redevelop lands filled with abandoned buildings

WWMT.com
February 7, 2017

MIThrive coalition calls for new brownfield economic development tool

The Oakland Press
February 9, 2017

Brownfield legislation would alter development costs, profits in Michigan

The Peninsula
February 10, 2017

WE ARE A STATEWIDE COALITION FROM GRAND RAPIDS, SAGINAW, JACKSON, KALAMAZOO, DETROIT, BENTON HARBOR, LANSING, FLINT, TRAVERSE CITY AND THE UPPER PENINSULA

Coalition Map
    • Barry J. Polzin The Landing Development Group LLC, The Landing Development Group II LLC, One Marquette Place, Marquette
    • Amy J. Clickner,  Lake Superior Community Partnership, Marquette
    • Justin Knepper, Sault Ste. Marie Downtown Development Authority, Sault Ste. Marie
    •  Joel Schultz, Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Regional Alliance, Escanaba
    • Doug Luciani, Traverse CONNECT, Traverse City
    • Carlin Smith, Northern Michigan Chamber Alliance
      • Petoskey Regional Chamber
      • Chamber of Commerce, Alpena
      • Benzie Chamber of Commerce, Benzie
      • Cadillac Chamber of Commerce, Cadillac
      • Charlevoix Chamber of Commerce, Charlevoix
      • Gaylord Chamber of Commerce, Gaylord
      • Petoskey Chamber of Commerce, Petoskey
      • Lake Superior Community Partnership, Marquette
      • Traverse City Chamber of Commerce, Traverse City
  • Stephen J. Gawron, Mayor, City of Muskegon
  • Birgit Klohs, The Right Place, Inc., Grand Rapids 
  • Sam Cummings, CWD Real Estate, Grand Rapids
  • Rich Baker, Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce, Grand Rapids
  • Ron Kitchens, Southwest Michigan First, Kalamazoo
  • John Avery, Michigan Economic Developers Association, Lansing
  • Robert L. Trezise, Lansing Economic Area Partnership, Lansing
  • Daniel A. Damman, Mayor, City of Marysville
  • Kurt Heise, Supervisor, Plymouth Township
  • Rob Cleveland, Cornerstone Alliance, Benton Harbor
  • Jane Clark, Michigan West Coast Chamber of Commerce, Holland/Zeeland
  • James Van Doren, Lenawee Now, Lenawee County
  •  Jake Eckholm, City Manager, Muskegon Heights
  • Irene Spanos, Director, Economic Development and Community Affairs, Oakland County
  • Kyle McCree, Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce, Flint
  • Capitol Council of Governments (CAPCOG), Lansing
  • Jeff Deason, Shiawassee Regional Chamber of Commerce, Owosso
  • Paula Boase, Downriver Community Conference, Southgate
  • Rob Campau, Michigan Realtors©, Lansing
  • Jeff Wiggins, Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan, Lansing
  • Patrick H. Burtch, City Manager, City of Jackson
  • Mindy Bradish-Orta, Jackson County Chamber of Commerce, Jackson Anchor Initiative, City of Jackson
  • Shannon Morgan, HRS Communities, Farmington Hills
  • Frederick E Zorn, Jr., CEcD, City of Southfield
  • Tim C. Lake, Monroe County Business Development Corporation, Monroe County
  • Dan Gilbert, Quicken Loans, Detroit
  • Sandy K. Baruah, Detroit Regional Chamber, Detroit
  • Eric Larson, Downtown Detroit Partnership, Detroit
  • Janet Langlois, Building Owners and Managers Association/Metro Detroit, Detroit
  • Dave Blaszkiewicz, Invest Detroit, Detroit
  • Peter Cummings, The Platform, Detroit
  • Grace Shore, Macomb County Chamber of Commerce, Macomb County
  • Luke Bonner, Senior Economic Advisor, Sterling Heights 
  • Mark Vanderpool, City Manager, Sterling Heights
  • Dr. Deirdre Waterman, Mayor, City of Pontiac
  • Phil Hagerman, Skypoint Ventures, Flint
  • JoAnn Crary, Saginaw Future Inc., Saginaw-Midland
  • Sam Shaheen, Shaheen Development, Saginaw-Midland
  • Veronica Horn, Saginaw County Chamber, Saginaw-Midland
  • Don Schurr, Greater Gratiot Development, Inc., Gratiot County
  • James McBryde, Mid-Michigan Development Company, Mt. Pleasant
  • Bryan K. Barnett, Mayor, City of Rochester Hills
  • Matt Felan, Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance, Great Lakes Bay Region
  • Tim Daman, Lansing Chamber of Commerce, Lansing
  • Jennifer Owens, Lakeshore Advantage, Zeeland
  • Dan Swallow, City Manager, City of Tecumseh
  • Jim Wagner, City Administrator, City of Trenton
  • Linda K. Hoath, Sault Area Convention Visitors Bureau, Sault Ste. Marie
  • Scott Fleming, Marshall Area Economic Development Alliance (MAEDA), Marshall
  • Michigan Municipal League, Ann Arbor
  • Justin Horvath, Shiawassee Economic Development Partnership, Owosso
  • Chris Barnett, Supervisor, Orion Township
  • Gary Wall, Supervisor, Waterford Township

Contact Us.

Can’t find what you are looking for? Email inquiry@mithrivecoalition.com